Roughrider Rancher of the Year Award Goes to Former World Bareback Riding Champion – The Dickinson Press

DICKINSON — North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame inductee Wayne Herman has been selected as the 2022 Breeder of the Year by the Roughrider Commission.

A Golden Valley native, Herman started out in the PRCA, making multiple National Finals Rodeo appearances and later being inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. He still keeps rodeo and ranching close to his heart.

From Friday to Saturday, Herman was honored in front of a packed grandstand at the Roughrider Days PRCA Rodeo at Stark County Fairgrounds with his new honor.

Livestock and rodeo go hand in hand. It’s cattle and horses. The skills you use at the ranch are mostly related or derived from most rodeo events.

wayne herman

In this black and white photograph, young Wayne Herman is seen playing with his farm equipment.

Contributed / Wayne Herman

The 58-year-old raises Black Angus cattle near Halliday, Dunn County, the same place his wife’s great-great-grandfather had in the early 1900s, before Halliday became a town.

“It’s quite an honour. I am happy to receive it,” Herman said. “I truly appreciate all that the Roughrider Commission has done for the Dickinson area and this rodeo over the years. It is a very nice reward and I appreciate it.

Wayne Herman, pictured above, has won nearly every North American bareback riding championship and is a former PRCA World Champion.
Wayne Herman, pictured above, has won nearly every North American bareback riding championship and is a former PRCA World Champion. In 2014 he was named a ProRodeo Hall of Fame inductee.

Photo submitted

As a world champion bareback rider in 1992, Herman started rodeo at a very young age.

“It’s who I am. I grew up on a ranch near Golden Valley, North Dakota, about 40 miles east of Killdeer. We grew up riding horses and calf roping and calf riding and going to kiddie rodeos all over here,” Herman said, recalling, “At that time there were a lot of kiddie rodeos from Dodge, Halliday, Killdeer, Beulah, Richardton, Hebron, Glen Ullin. Within a very short distance there are a lot of them and my parents took me to a lot of kiddie rodeos and started doing that.”

In the 1990s, Herman dominated the bareback riding circuit across the United States, winning nearly every North American bareback riding championship. He qualified for the NFR 11 times, finished in the top five six times, and earned over $850,000 during his rodeo career. In 1991 he won the NFR middleweight title and was world runner-up.

Following an injury, Herman decided it was time to hang up his rig in 1998 and retire from bareback riding.


However, Herman did not completely stray from the rodeo arena; he was heavily involved in rodeo schools, teaching young cowboys how to ride horses safely. He taught at both Dickinson State University and Korkow Rodeo School for approximately 30 years.

In this undated photo, Wayne Herman, from Golden Valley, North Dakota, rolls for 8 seconds on top of a bronc.
In this undated photo, Wayne Herman, from Golden Valley, North Dakota, rolls for 8 seconds on top of a bronc. According to the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, Herman is one of the most consistent bareback riders of his generation with six finishes in the top five bareback riders in the world in addition to his world championship season.

Contributed / Wayne Herman

He represented Dickinson very well, especially North Dakota, back when he was bronc. It’s good now that we return the favor and recognize him for the work he has done in this area while being a breeder…at the same time.

Lori Vernon

In 2014 he was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame as well as the North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame.

Over the years, Herman has worn many hats, from world champion bareback rider, managing grain elevators, to running an oilfield trucking company.

In this file photo, North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame trustee Don Schmid, far left, interviews four-time world champion bareback rider Brad Gjermundson and Wayne Herman, 1992 world bareback champion, during of the season premiere at the North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame.
In this file photo, North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame trustee Don Schmid, far left, interviews four-time world champion bareback rider Brad Gjermundson and Wayne Herman, 1992 world bareback champion, during of the season premiere at the North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame.

Photo from the Dickinson press kit

Wayne Herman and his wife Connie are pictured.
Wayne Herman and his wife Connie are pictured.

Contributed / Wayne Herman

Today, Herman and his family still operate Herman Energy Service, providing frac water transfers and providing third-party labor to the oilfield.

Along with oilfield operations, Herman still enjoys being a cowboy, ranching on the property of his wife’s great-great-grandfather.

“Breeding and rodeo go hand in hand,” he said. “It’s cattle and horses. The skills you use on the ranch are mostly related or derived from most rodeo events.”

Wayne Herman, left, and his family are pictured.
Wayne Herman, left, and his family are pictured.

Contributed / Wayne Herman

The Breeder of the Year award is given to someone who has been involved in rodeo and ranching, Roughrider commission secretary Lori Vernon said, adding that Herman “just fits the invoice”.

“I think he really deserves it. I’m glad they picked him. He represented Dickinson really well, especially North Dakota, back when he was bronc. It’s good now that we return the favor and recognize him for the work he has done in this area while being a breeder…at the same time,” Vernon said, noting, “He was a good fit for the award.

Black Angus calves from the Wayne Herman Ranch near Halliday, North Dakota show off their new markings.
Black Angus calves from the Wayne Herman Ranch near Halliday, North Dakota show off their new markings. The mark, an upside-down P over an H, is one of the first marks to be registered in Mercer County, North Dakota. The mark is the original mark of Wayne Herman’s great-great-grandfather – Peter Herman – used in the early 1900s.

Jackie Jahfetson / The Dickinson Press

Clyde P. Johnson